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Arizona Tenants Advocates & Association
Historical Articles

Renters Share Stories of
Eviction over Owners' Foreclosures


The Arizona Republic
by Lynh Bui - Sept. 21, 2008 12:00 AM

Jacob's Ranch in Pinal County isn't the only place where tenants have found themselves getting evicted from their landlords' foreclosures. Three other Valley renters share their stories:


Titus Fisher - Avondale

How he found out: A letter was left on the door in August informing him that the house would be going up for auction in November.

Who's moving: Fisher, his mother, his seven kids ranging in age from 2 to 17 years old.

Will he get his deposit back?: Yes.

He says: "All my kids are already established or in school. My son plays football for La Joya [Community] High School. I don't want to uproot them . . . I wish the owner would have given me three or four months' warning instead of dropping the bomb."


Christina Foote - Litchfield Park

How she found out: When the owner tried to do a short sale on the house, she confronted her real-estate agent, who told her the house was going into foreclosure.

Who's moving: Foote, her husband and two kids live on an acre lot with six dogs, a miniature horse and several reptiles.

Will she get her deposit back?: No, $200.

She says: "I just lost my job a couple weeks ago. We're on a limited income, and one of my kids will have to switch schools.

"I have paid rent on time every month, but you don't even have the decency to give me a little bit of notice? I've already contacted some attorneys."


Ann Coyne - Fountain Hills

How she found out: She signed a lease and moved into a home in June. On July 25, she got a letter saying that she had to vacate by July 31 or face eviction.

Who's moving: Coyne, an 18-year-old son and an 11-year-old daughter.

Will she get her deposit back?: No, $1,800.

She says: "The thing that upset me the most is when I signed the lease, the landlord knew at the time he was going to get foreclosed. He did not give me any indication anything else was going on and took $1,800 in deposit.

"I spent about $400 in attorney's fees and found out the only option I had was to prove the landlord had committed fraud. I have no legal leg to stand on to fight this. I felt truly hopeless."

Coyne is coordinating a committee to raise money for a lobbyist and support new laws to protect renters. Information: E-mail rentersrights08@yahoo.com.

Original Article


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